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About ASCoR

Awards

Amsterdam School of Communication Research / ASCoR

ASCoR hosts three journal article awards that are awarded annually.

McQuail Award

The ASCoR Denis McQuail Award is awarded to the best article advancing communication theory published in a peer-reviewed journal in the previous two years. An international Award committee makes the selection, and the award is given to the first author of the winning article.

The latest winner (2018)

Dr. Edmund W.J. Lee won the award with his article:

  • Lee, E. W., Ho, S. S., & Lwin, M. O. (2017). Explicating problematic social network sites use: A review of concepts, theoretical frameworks, and future directions for communication theorizing. New Media & Society19(2), 308-326. doi:10.1177/1461444816671891
  • Previous Winners

    Dr. Gil de Zúñiga won the award with his article:

    • Gil de Zúñiga, H., Weeks, B., & Ardèvol-Abreu, A. (2017). Effects of the news-finds-me perception in communication: Social media use implications for news seeking and learning about politics. Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication, 22, 105-123. doi:10.1111/jcc4.12185

    Prof. Nurit Tal-Or won the award with her article:

    • Tal-Or, N., Tsfati, Y. (2016) When Arabs and Jews Watch TV Together: The Joint Effect of the Content and Context of Communication on Reducing Prejudice. Journal of Communication 66, 646-668. doi:10.1111/jcom.12242

    Prof. Zheng Joyce Wang won the award with her article:

    • Wang, Z, Irwin, M, Cooper, C, & Srivastava J. (2015) Multidimensions of media multitasking and adaptive media selection. Human Communication Research 41, 102-127. DOI:10.1111/hcre.12042

    Prof. Robin L. Nabi won the award with her article:

    • Nabi, R. L., & Keblusek, L. (2014). Inspired by hope, motivated by envy: Comparing the effects of discrete emotions in the process of social comparison to media figures. Media Psychology, 17, 208-234. DOI:10.1080/15213269.2013.878663

    Prof. Richard M. Perloff won the award with his article:

    • Perloff, R. M. (2013). Progress, paradigms, and a discipline engaged: A response to Lang and reflections on media effects research. Communication Theory, 23, 317-333. DOI:10.1111/comt.12024

     Prof. W. James Potter won the award with his article:

    • Potter, W. J. (2011). Conceptualizing mass media effect. Journal of Communication, 61, 896-915. DOI:10.1111/j.1460-2466.2011.01586.x

    Prof. James G. Webster won the award with his article:

    • Webster, J. G. (2011). The duality of media: A structurational theory of public attention. Communication Theory, 21, 43-66DOI:10.1111/j.1468-2885.2010.01375.x

    Dr. Robert LaRose won the award with his article:

    • LaRose, R. (2010). The problem of media habits. Communication Theory, 20, 194-222. DOI: 10.1111/j.1468-2885.2010.01360.x

    Dr. Kelly Garrett won the award with his article:

    • Garrett, R. K. (2009). Politically motivated reinforcement seeking: Reframing the selective exposure debate. Journal of Communication, 59, 676-699. DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-2466.2009.01452.x

    Dr. Cristina Archetti won the award with her article:

    • Archetti, C. (2008). News coverage of 9/11 and the demise of the media flows, globalization and localization hypotheses. International Communication Gazette, 70, 463-485.

    Prof. Michael Slater won the award with his article:

    • Slater, M. D. (2007). Reinforcing spirals: the mutual influence of media selectivity and media effects and their impact on individual behavior and social identity. Communication Theory, 17, 281-303.

    Matthew A. Baum & Angela S. Jamison won the award with their article:

    • Baum, M. A., & Jamison, A. S. (2006) The Oprah effect: How soft news helps inattentive citizens vote consistently. The Journal of Politics, 68,946-959.

  • Eligibility

    Eligible articles:
    •    Includes journal articles or book(chapters)
    •    Must have been published (not 'due to appear') in the previous two years in an English language peer-reviewed journal or university press.
    •    May be purely theoretical or empirical and theoretical, but the focus should clearly be on theory development.
    •    Must focus on some aspect of communication. NB: Articles published in non-communication journals are also eligible.
    •    Articles first-authored by ASCoR members are excluded from nomination.

    Selection: 
    An international panel will select the winning article from a list of nominated articles.
    The selection will be based on the quality of the article, not on the author(s)' professional or personal credentials. The number of nominations for an article plays no role in the selection process: Each article that has been nominated at least once will be considered. Please note that the jury may decide not to give the Award if none of the nominations are considered to stand out.

    Award:
    The award is given to the first author of the selected publication. The award consists of a certificate, and an invitation to the 1st author to become the McQuail Honorary Fellow at ASCoR for one academic year, as well as to give a guest lecture in Amsterdam.

Baschwitz Article of the Year Award

The ASCoR Baschwitz Article of the Year Award is awarded to the author of the best article published by an ASCoR staff member first-authored in a peer-reviewed journal in the preceding year.

  • Previous Winners

    Judith Möller won the 2018 award for her article:

    • Möller, J.E., Trilling, D.C., Helberger, N., & van Es, B. (2018). Do not blame it on the algorithm: An empirical assessment of multiple recommender systems and their impact on content diversity. Information Communication and Society, 21, 959-977.

    Both Sophie Boerman and Karin Fikkers won the 2017 award for their articles:

    • Fikkers, K. M., Piotrowski, J., & Valkenburg, P. M. (2017). Assessing the reliability and validity of television and game violence exposure measures. Communication Research, 44, 117-143.
    • Boerman, S. C., Kruikemeier, S.,& Zuiderveen Borgesius, F. J. (2017).Online behavioral advertising: A literature review and research agenda. Journal of Advertising,46, 363-376.

    Rens Vliegenthart won the 2016 award for his article:

    • Vliegenthart, R., Walgrave, S., Wouters, R., Hutter, S., Jennings, W., Gava, R., Tresh, A., Varone, F., Grossman, E., Beunig, C., Brourard, S., Chaques-Bonafont, L. (2016). The Media as a Dual Mediator of the Political Agenda–Setting Effect of Protest. A Longitudinal Study in Six Western European Countries. Social Forces, 95(2), 837-859. 

    Sophie Boerman won the 2015 award for her article:

    • Boerman, S.C., Reijmersdal, E.A. van & Neijens, P.C. (2015). Using eye tracking to understand the effects of brand placement disclosure types in television programs. Journal of Advertising, 44 (3), 196-207.

    Marieke Fransen won the 2014 award for her article:

    • Fransen, M. L., & Fennis, B. M. (2014). Comparing the impact of explicit and implicit resistance induction strategies on message persuasiveness. Journal of Communication, 64, 915-934.

    Patti Valkenburg won the 2013 award for her article:

    • Valkenburg, P. M., & Peter, J. (2013). The differential susceptibility to media effects model. Journal of Communication, 63, 221-243.

    Marcel van Egmond won the 2012 award for his article:

    •  Brandenburg, H., & Van Egmond, M. (2012). Pressed into party support? Media influence on partisan attitudes during the 2005 UK general election campaign.  British Journal of Political Science, 42, 441-463.

    Bas van den Putte won the 2011 award for his article:

    • van den Putte, S. J. H. M., Yzer, M., Southwell, B. G., de Bruijn, G. J., & Willemsen, M. C. (2011). Interpersonal communication as an indirect pathway for the effect of antismoking media content on smoking cessation.  Journal of Health Communication, 16, 470-485.

    Moniek Buijzen won the 2010 award for her article:

    • Buijzen, M. A., van Reijmersdal, E. A., & Owen, L. H. (2010). Introducing the PCMC model: An investigative framework for young people’s processing of commercialized media content. Communication Theory, 20, 427-450.

    Andreas Schuck won the 2009 award for his article:

    • Schuck, A. R. T., & de Vreese, C. H. (2009). Reversed mobilization in referendum campaigns: How positive news framing can mobilize the skeptics. International Journal of Press/Politics, 14, 40-66.

    Jochen Peter won the 2008 award for his article:

    • Peter, J., & Valkenburg, P. M. (2008). Adolescents' exposure to sexually explicit Internet material and sexual preoccupancy: A three-wave panel study. Media Psychology, 11, 207-234.

    Moniek Buijzen won the 2007 award for her article:

    • Buijzen, M. A. (2007). Reducing children's susceptibility to commercials: Mechanisms of factual and evaluative advertising interventions. Media Psychology, 9, 411-430.

    Jochen Peter won the 2006 award for his article together with Patti Valkenburg:

    • Peter, J., & Valkenburg, P. M. (2006). Adolescents' exposure to sexually explicit online material and recreational attitudes toward sex. Journal of Communication, 56, 639-660.

    Bas van den Putte won the 2005 award for his article:

    • van den Putte, S. H. J. M., Yzer, M. C., & Brunsting, S. (2005). Social influences on smoking cessation: A comparison of the effects of six social influence variables. Preventive Medicine, 41, 186-193.
  • Eligibility

    Eligible articles: 
    ASCoR staff members, including postdoctoral researchers, can qualify for this award. Former ASCoR staff members qualify until one year after their contract has ended. The article must have been published (not ‘due to appear') in the preceding year, in a peer-reviewed journal, must have an ASCoR staff member as the first author, and must have resulted from research conducted at ASCoR (i.e., not research that was conducted during a previous appointment at a different institute). ASCoR must be mentioned in the published article as the principal affiliation. The award will go to the first author of the article chosen.

    Selection: 
    All ASCoR researchers can nominate articles from a list of eligible articles. Self-nominations are accepted. The selection committee consists of three scholars from different universities.

    Award: 
    The winner of this award recieves a certificate, a feature on the ASCoR website, and an invitation to give an ASCoR lecture about the awarded research.

Baschwitz Article of the Year Award for Young Researchers

This award was established as an incentive to ASCoR PhD candidates, and is given for the best article published by an ASCoR PhD candidate first-authored in a peer-reviewed journal in the preceding year.

  • Previous Winners

    Michael Hameleers won the 2018 award for his article:

    • Hameleers, M., Bos, L., Fawzi, N., Reinemann, C., Andreadis, I., Corbu, N., Schemer, C., Schulz, A., Shaefer, T., Aalberg, T., Axelsson, S., Berganza, R., Cremonesi, C., Dahlberg, S., De Vreese, C.H., et al., (2018). Start spreading the news: A comparative experiment on the effects of populist communication on political engagement in sixteen European countries. The International Journal of Press/Politics, 23, 517-538.

    Claire Segijn won the 2017 award for her article:

    • Segijn, C. M., Voorveld, H. A. M., Vandeberg, L., & Smit, E. G. (2017). The Battle of the screens: Unraveling attention allocation and memory effects when multiscreening. Human Communication Research, 43, 295-314.

    Claire Segijn won the 2016 award for the article:

    • Segijn, C. M., Voorveld, H. A. M., & Smit, E. G. (2016). The Underlying Mechanisms of Multiscreening Effects. Journal of Advertising, 45(4), 391-402.

    Nadine Stauß won the 2015 award for the article:

    • Strauß, N., Kruikemeier, S., van der Meulen, H., & van Noort, G. (2015). Digital diplomacy in GCC countries: Strategic communication of Western embassies on Twitter. Government Information Quarterly, 32(4), 369-379.

    Sanne Opree won the 2014 award for the article:

    • Opree, S. J., Buijzen, M., Van Reijmersdal, E. A., & Valkenburg, P. M. (2014). Children's advertising exposure, advertised product desire, and materialism: A longitudinal study. Communication Research, 41, 717-735.

     Sanne Kruikemeier won the 2013 award for the article:

    • Kruikemeier, S., Van Noort, G., Vliegenthart, R., & De Vreese, C. H. (2013). Getting closer: The effects of personalized and interactive online political communication. European Journal of Communication, 28, 53-66.

    Susanne Baumgartner won the 2012 award for the article:

    •  Baumgartner, S. E., Sumter, S. R., Peter, J., & Valkenburg, P. M. (2012). Identifying teens at risk: Developmental pathways of online and offline sexual risk behavior.  Pediatrics, 130, e1489-e1496.

    Lotte Willemsen won the 2011 award for the article:

    • Willemsen, L. M., Neijens, P. C., Bronner, A. E., & de Ridder, J. A. (2011). 'Highly recommended!': The content characteristics and perceived usefulness of online consumer reviews.  Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication, 17, 19-38.

    Mario Keer won the 2010 award for the article:

    • Keer, M., van den Putte, S. J. H. M., & Neijens, P. C. (2010). The role of affect and cognition in health decision making. British Journal of Social Psychology, 49, 143-153.

    Sophie Lecheler won the 2009 award for the article:

    • Lecheler, S., de Vreese, C. H., & Slothuus, R. (2009). Issue importance as a moderator of framing effects. Communication Research, 36, 400-425.

    Andreas Schuck won the 2008 award for the article:

    • Schuck, A., & de Vreese, C. H. (2008). The Dutch No to the EU Constitution: Assessing the role of EU skepticism and the campaign. Journal of Elections, Public Opinion & Parties, 18(1), 101-128.

    Alexander Schouten won the 2007 award for the article together with Patti Valkenburg and Jochen Peter:

    • Schouten, A., Valkenburg, P. M., & Peter, J. (2007). Precursors and underlying processes of adolescents' online self-disclosure: Testing an "Internet-Attribute-Perception" model. Media Psychology10, 292-315.

    Andreas Schuck won the 2006 award for the article together with Claes de Vreese:

    • Schuck, A. R. T., & de Vreese, C. H. (2006). Between risk and opportunity: News framing and its effects on public support for EU enlargement. European Journal of Communication, 21(1), 5-3

    Eva van Reijmersdal won the 2005 award for the article together with Peter Neijens and Edith Smit:

    • Van Reijmersdal, E. A., Neijens, P. C., & Smit, E. G. (2005). Readers' reactions to mixtures of advertising and editorial content in magazines. Journal of Current Issues and Research in Advertising27(2), 39-53.
  • Eligibilty

    Eligibility:
    All PhD candidates enrolled in the ASCoR PhD programme are eligible for this award. Former ASCoR PhD candidates are eligible for a period of one year after their dissertation defense. The article must have been published (not ‘due to appear’) in a peer-reviewed journal during the previous calendar year, must have an ASCoR PhD candidate as its first author, and must have resulted from research conducted at ASCoR (i.e., not from research conducted for the author's MA thesis). ASCoR must be stated in the published article as the first author’s primary affiliation. The award is given to the the PhD student listed as first author of the article.

    Selection: 
    All ASCoR researchers can nominate articles from a list of eligible articles. Self-nominations are accepted. The selection committee consists of three scholars from different universities.

    Award:
    The winner of this award receives a certificate, is featured on the ASCoR website and receives €250 in book vouchers.